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15 juillet 2007 7 15 /07 /juillet /2007 23:04
Setback for al-Qaida operatives in Diyala

Sunday, 15 July 2007

Multi-National Corps – Iraq
Public Affairs Office, Camp Victory
APO AE 09342

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
RELEASE No. 20070715-07
July 15, 2007

Setback for al-Qaida operatives in Diyala
Multi-National Division – North PAO

BAQOUBA, Iraq – Iraqi Army and Coalition Forces, using tips from local citizens, targeted al-Qaida operatives outside Diyala’s provincial capital July 11, in a continued effort to deny any safe-haven to the terrorist group.
 
Soldiers from 1st Battalion, 2nd Brigade, 5th Iraqi Army Division, and 5th Squadron, 73rd Cavalry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, conducted Operation Ithaca, targeting al-Qaida operatives near the villages of Haimer, Abu Nasim, and Jamil, Iraq, resulting in 29 al-Qaida gunmen killed, 23 detained, eight hostages released, two weapons caches discovered and a safe house destroyed.
 
“This operation was vital as we continue to deny al-Qaida freedom of movement and space,” said Col. David W. Sutherland, 3-1 Cav. commander. “In Diyala, the enemy has no safe haven; and our forces are committed to aid the Iraqi Security Forces in their fight to provide a safe and secure environment for the people.”
 
25th Combat Aviation Brigade helicopters kicked off the operation early Thursday morning with Soldiers from Company B, 5-73 Cav. conducting an air assault into the objective areas. Throughout the operation, Soldiers identified numerous gunmen moving along the palm groves and water canals attempting to escape.  
 
An al-Qaida safe house was also identified with gunmen moving in and out of the building.  25th CAB attack helicopters engaged and killed the gunmen fleeing the area along canals and palm groves, and helped destroy the safe house with Hellfire missiles.
 
“The success of this operation would not have been possible without the people of these villages who are now turning against al-Qaida,” Sutherland said. “More and more, the people and tribes are becoming disgusted and disillusioned with what al-Qaida offers. They are forming local resistance groups to guard their neighborhoods and deny the enemy any freedom of movement.”

The caches consisted of small-arms munitions, mortars, improvised explosive device making material and other enemy propaganda.
 
“This … not only shows that the people are determined to defeat AQIZ, but it is also proof that the people are gaining confidence in the Iraqi and Coalition Forces to provide them a safe and secure environment,” Sutherland added.
 
While patrolling the Abu Tauma village, eight hostages, who previously suffered severe beatings and lashings, were freed and transferred to a Coalition medical facility for treatment.

-30-

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15 juillet 2007 7 15 /07 /juillet /2007 09:02
Commander says Iraq surge operations have ‘significant’ impact

Saturday, 14 July 2007
Iraqi forces patrol alongside Marines during a recent sweeping operation in Baghdadi, Iraq, July 5, 2007. The operation served as both a test of the Iraqi Army's abilities, and a sweeping mission to clear weapons from the area. Courtesy photo.
Iraqi forces patrol alongside Marines during a recent sweeping operation in Baghdadi, Iraq, July 5, 2007. The operation served as both a test of the Iraqi Army's abilities, and a sweeping mission to clear weapons from the area. Courtesy photo.
BAGHDAD — Ongoing anti-insurgent operations conducted in and around Baghdad and to the south of Iraq’s capital city are achieving continued success, a senior U.S. military officer said Friday during a teleconference with retired military analysts.

U.S. Army Maj. Gen. Rich Lynch, commander of Multi-National Division-Center and U.S. Army’s 3rd Infantry Division, said he is optimistic that the surge will reduce violence in Baghdad while seriously disrupting insurgent operations in Iraq.

 

“Eventually, I believe you’ll see (an) improved security situation inside of Baghdad” due to the surge operations, he said. “But, it’s not going to happen overnight.”

 

Seeing on TV that the surge has minimal impact on the insurgents, “causes me great confusion,” he noted.

 

In reality, U.S. and Iraqi security forces participating in Operation Marne Torch are busily knocking out insurgent sanctuaries located within his battle space, Lynch said, which includes parts of eastern and southern Baghdad, as well as Najaf, Karbala, Babil and Wasit provinces.

 

“We’ve had significant impact on the enemy with the surge forces,” Lynch asserted. “I contend that they are indeed being successful.” Yet, he cautioned it will take some time to gauge the overall effectiveness of the surge operations.

 

Operation Marne Torch is one of several ongoing operations that are part of an overall offensive against insurgents in IraqU.S. troops to Iraq earlier this year as a surge of forces to assist the Iraqi government in confronting the insurgency. called Operation Phantom Thunder, which began June 15, once all of the surge troops were in place. President Bush directed a deployment of about 30,000 additional

 

Many surge-related operations designed to eliminate enemy activity in Baghdad and its environs are being conducted within Multi-National Division-Center’s battle space, Lynch said. Since it was launched nearly a month ago, Operation Marne Torch has killed or captured 300 insurgents and netted 60 large enemy weapons caches, the general reported.

 

When he surveyed his area of operations in March before all the surge troops had arrived, Lynch observed there were four enemy sanctuaries that needed to be taken out.

 

Those sanctuaries were used by Sunni and Shiite insurgents, as well as al Qaeda in Iraq operatives, because “there weren’t any security forces” in the area, Lynch explained.

 

“So, we’ve got major operations across my battle space to disrupt those four sanctuaries,” Lynch said. One ongoing operation is focused on knocking out Sunni-insurgent strongholds in the Tigris River valley region, including the Arab Jabour area south of Baghdad.

 

Lynch said another offensive, Marne Avalanche, has just commenced against Sunni and Shiite insurgents operating in the Euphrates River valley.

 

And, a top al-Qaeda in Iraq chieftain believed responsible for the downing of a U.S. helicopter in April 2006 and the adduction and killing of two Soldiers in June 2006 was apprehended July 9 thanks to tips from Iraqi citizens, Lynch said. Iraqi citizens had tipped off Coalition forces about the location of a large enemy weapons cache that day, he noted, while local Iraqi militia had captured the suspected terrorist and turned him over to coalition authorities.

 

Lynch also pointed to suspected Iranian support of insurgents in Iraq, noting his troops have found numerous rocket-propelled grenades and other ordnance, including powerful explosive-formed-penetrator munitions, with Iranian markings.

 

The Iranian ordnance is being trucked-in into Iraq from the border in Wasit province, Lynch explained, noting much of it has been delivered to Shiite-backed insurgent groups. Lynch said U.S. and Iraqi troops, including a brigade from the country of Georgia, are setting up additional checkpoints in that area to intercept such cross-border arms shipments.

 

Yesterday, Coalition troops patrolling east of the Tigris River destroyed 40 enemy-emplaced, Iranian-sourced rockets that were aimed at U.S. troops, Lynch said.

 

(Story by Gerry J. Gilmore American Forces Press Service)

 

In other developments throughout Iraq:

 

•           Marines from Company I, Battalion Landing Team 3rd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment, 13th Marine Expeditionary Unit, discovered 500, one hundred-pound bags of ammonium nitrate July 11.

 

 

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9 juillet 2007 1 09 /07 /juillet /2007 20:05
The Latest
Sadr in Iran or Najaf?
Despite Denials, Mixed Reports Spark Speculation Shi'ite Leader Has Left Iraq
Posted 4 hr. 3 min. ago
Baghdad, IRAQ: An Iraqi boy is reflected on the glass of a framed picture of Shiite firebrand cleric Moqtada al-Sadr.
AHMAD AL-RUBAYE/AFP/Getty Images
Baghdad, IRAQ: An Iraqi boy is reflected on the glass of a framed picture of Shiite firebrand cleric Moqtada al-Sadr.
A Sadrist legislator is rejecting claims by the US military that the Shi'ite leader has fled to Iran, accusing the Americans of propagating rumors to "undermine the Sadrist bloc."

Verbal sparring between the Maliki and Sadr camps has dominated the Iraqi political scene in recent days.

Al-Maliki announced Saturday that the Sadrist Current has become a “host for criminal gangs” and is inhabited by “Saddamists and Ba'thists” who commit crimes and attacks against civilians.

Ahmad Al Shibani, a senior aid of cleric Moqtada Al Sadr, shot back that al-Maliki’s government is “practically over, in what concerns us and the occupation" and accused the PM of giving a "green light" for US forces to attack Sadrists.

Reuters reported Sunday that a military source said Sadr had gone to Iran, raising speculation that the cleric may have feared the perceived "green light."

But Falah Hassan Shanshal, a member of parliament from the Sadrist bloc, rejected those reports on Monday, telling VOI, "Muqtada al-Sadr is now in Najaf, where he resides, and has never left Iraq for any other country."

Shansal also took the opportunity to heap more criticism on the Maliki regime, saying "Maliki's groundless accusations against the Sadrists were part of unbalanced statements. We say that the Baathists and takfirists have infiltrated into state institutions, which is indicated by governmental calls to have the former repressive security agencies back in public organizations."

He pointed out that the Maliki government "has turned out to be a failure, one and a half years after coming to power, as far as providing security and services to citizens are concerned."

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8 juillet 2007 7 08 /07 /juillet /2007 22:55
Photo Gallery
US-Allied Militants Battle al-Qaeda in Diyala
Sunni Militants Wearing Red Ribbons Hunting Down al-Qaeda Operatives
Posted 20 hr. 41 min. ago
Photo by Stringer/AFP-Getty Images

Um Al-Izam, IRAQ: Local Sunni militiamen who decided to fight Al-Qaeda conduct a search and raid operation, 07 July 2007 in Um Al-Izam southwest of the restive city of Baquba, in the Diyala Province. Iraqi and US forces are conducting a major military operation aimed at clearing the restive province from Al-Qaeda strongholds.
Um Al-Izam, IRAQ: Local Sunni militiamen who decided to fight Al-Qaeda evacuate their comrade who was wounded by a roadside bomb during a search and raid operation, 07 July 2007 in Um Al-Izam southwest of the restive city of Baquba.
Photo by Stringer/AFP-Getty Images
Um Al-Izam, IRAQ: Local Sunni militiamen who decided to fight Al-Qaeda evacuate their comrade who was wounded by a roadside bomb during a search and raid operation, 07 July 2007 in Um Al-Izam southwest of the restive city of Baquba.

Um Al-Izam, IRAQ: A local Sunni militiaman who decided to fight Al-Qaeda takes a combat position during a search and raid operation, 07 July 2007 in Um Al-Izam southwest of the restive city of Baquba, in the Diyala Province.
Photo by Stringer/AFP-Getty Images
Um Al-Izam, IRAQ: A local Sunni militiaman who decided to fight Al-Qaeda takes a combat position during a search and raid operation, 07 July 2007 in Um Al-Izam southwest of the restive city of Baquba, in the Diyala Province.

Um Al-Izam, IRAQ: Local Sunni militiamen who decided to fight Al-Qaeda treat their comrade who was wounded in the explosion of a roadside bomb during a search and raid operation, 07 July 2007 in Um Al-Izam southwest of the restive city of Baquba, in the Diyala Province.
Photo by Stringer/AFP-Getty Images
Um Al-Izam, IRAQ: Local Sunni militiamen who decided to fight Al-Qaeda treat their comrade who was wounded in the explosion of a roadside bomb during a search and raid operation, 07 July 2007 in Um Al-Izam southwest of the restive city of Baquba, in the Diyala Province.

Um Al-Izam, IRAQ: A local Sunni militiaman (R) who decided to fight Al-Qaeda ties the hands of a suspect whom he has arrested, 07 July 2007 during a raid in Um Al-Izam southwest of the restive city of Baquba, in the Diyala Province.
Photo by Stringer/AFP-Getty Images
Um Al-Izam, IRAQ: A local Sunni militiaman (R) who decided to fight Al-Qaeda ties the hands of a suspect whom he has arrested, 07 July 2007 during a raid in Um Al-Izam southwest of the restive city of Baquba, in the Diyala Province.

Um Al-Izam, IRAQ: Local Sunni militiamen who decided to fight Al-Qaeda guard blindfolded suspects whom they arrested, 07 July 2007 during a raid in Um Al-Izam southwest of the restive city of Baquba, in the Diyala Province.
Photo by Stringer/AFP-Getty Images
Um Al-Izam, IRAQ: Local Sunni militiamen who decided to fight Al-Qaeda guard blindfolded suspects whom they arrested, 07 July 2007 during a raid in Um Al-Izam southwest of the restive city of Baquba, in the Diyala Province.
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5 juillet 2007 4 05 /07 /juillet /2007 13:45

Six Suspected Terrorists Detained and One Killed by Coalition Forces in Two Separate Raids

BAGHDAD, Iraq – Coalition Forces killed one terrorist and detained six suspected terrorists before dawn Thursday in and near Sadr City.  It is believed that the suspected terrorists were affiliated with secret cell Special Groups.

Coalition Forces conducted two raids to capture or kill terrorists suspected of providing logistical support to insurgent groups. Intelligence reports indicate that the suspected terrorists targeted during the raid were connected with other key secret cell terrorist leaders and are suspected to have ties to the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps – Quds Forces.

During the first raid, Coalition Forces were fired upon by terrorists.  Coalition Forces returned fire in accordance with the rules of engagement killing one terrorist.  There were no Coalition Forces casualties.  Coalition Forces confiscated automatic weapons, communications equipment and personal body armor during the raid.  In the second raid, Coalition Forces grabbed a single, suspected terrorist without firing a shot.

“Coalition troops will continue to target terrorists who have a penchant for killing Coalition Forces, Iraqi Security Forces and innocent Iraqis.” said Lt. Col. Christopher Garver, MNF-I spokesman.  “Coalition Forces will target secret cells wherever they are.”
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5 juillet 2007 4 05 /07 /juillet /2007 13:38
 

Wednesday, 04 July 2007


Two suspected al-Qaeda leaders, 7 others detained in Coalition raids

BAGHDAD, Iraq – Coalition Forces killed one terrorist and detained nine suspected terrorists during raids around the country Wednesday and Thursday targeting al-Qaeda in Iraq senior leaders and operatives.

Thursday morning, Coalition Forces targeted an al-Qaeda in Iraq explosives consultant suspected of helping improvised explosive device cells west of Baghdad.  As the ground forces entered the objective site, they encountered an armed man.  Acting in self-defense, Coalition Forces engaged the man, killing him. 

During the raid, another armed man emerged from an adjoining room within the building.  Coalition Forces reacted in self-defense and engaged the armed man, wounding him.  He was treated by medical personnel on site.  Coalition Forces detained three suspected terrorists during the operation.  Another raid Thursday morning netted one suspected terrorist allegedly involved with al-Qaeda in the Tarmiyah area.

Coalition Forces captured the al-Qaeda in Iraq administrative emir of a Baghdad neighborhood during a raid Wednesday.  The individual is suspected of handling logistics and financing for terrorists cells in the area, and arranging for movement of operatives for the organization.  The ground forces also detained three individuals suspected of associating with him.

 “We’re continuing to target all levels of the al-Qaeda in Iraq organization, and are disrupting both their leadership structure and operations,” said Lt. Col. Christopher Garver, MNF-I spokesperson. 



Multi-National Corps – Iraq
Public Affairs Office, Camp Victory
APO AE 09342

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
RELEASE No. 20070704-21
July 4, 2007

Operation “Iron Blitz” captures 25 insurgents in June
By Maj. Randall Baucom
1st BCT, 1st Cav. Div. Public Affairs
Multi-National Division – Baghdad PAO

CAMP TAJI, Iraq — Over the past 30 days, Multi-National Division-Baghdad Soldiers captured 25 suspected insurgents during Operation “Iron Blitz” northwest of the Iraqi capital.

The suspects, many believed to be tied to insurgent cells responsible for the emplacement of improvised explosive devices, sectarian violence and indirect fire attacks, were captured by Soldiers of the 1st “Ironhorse” Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division

“These (terrorists) were targeting not only Coalition Forces and Iraqi Security Forces, they were targeting the Iraqi people to escalate sectarian tensions in the area,” said Lt. Col. Peter Andrysiak, deputy commander of the Ironhorse Brigade. “The capture of these individuals has lead to a significant decrease in insurgent activity in our area.”

The Ironhorse Brigade was able to target insurgents successfully in northwestern Baghdad neighborhoods thanks to an influx of support, in the form of tips, from the local community, Andrysiak said.

“The volunteers who have recently stepped forward to provide security in their own neighborhoods provided much of the information used to capture these individuals,” he said.

A grassroots effort by tribal leaders in Abu Ghraib, Taji, and Saab al Bor areas, to reject Al Qaeda and work to reconcile with the government of Iraq, Iraqi Security Forces and the Coalition, is aimed at putting an end to sectarian violence in those communities. 

With 25 suspected insurgents captured in June, Andrysiak said communities in northwest Baghdad are headed in the right direction.

“By bringing these individuals to justice, we have seen a decrease in the violence in our area,” Andrysiak added. “With the help of the volunteers, we are optimistic the violence will not return.”

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3 juillet 2007 2 03 /07 /juillet /2007 20:33
Backgrounder
What Model Should Iraq Follow?
CFR Outlines South Korea, Vietnam, Bosnia, and Lebanon
By LIONEL BEEHNER Posted 2 hr. 7 min. ago
BABYLON, IRAQ: Two US coalition soldiers walk in front of a map of Iraq hung on the museum wall at ancient city of Babylon south of Bagdad.
ROSLAN RAHMAN/AFP/Getty
BABYLON, IRAQ: Two US coalition soldiers walk in front of a map of Iraq hung on the museum wall at ancient city of Babylon south of Bagdad.

Even as they disagree on how long American forces will remain in Iraq, U.S. officials and foreign policy experts suggest a number of scenarios for what Iraq might resemble after coalition forces eventually pull out. President Bush has proposed the so-called South Korean model, a long-term residual troop presence to prevent civil war from breaking out. Many have also likened the conflict to Vietnam, where the fall of Saigon did not unleash the massive “domino” effect many predicted. Others have offered Lebanon, which suffered from a long civil war before an uneasy truce was inked, as a more accurate template. Then there are those who say Iraq should become a federalized state, akin to post-1995 Bosnia. Experts disagree over the degree to which the conflict in Iraq could spread to neighboring countries.

The South Korea Model

Over fifty years after the Korean War, some thirty thousand U.S. troops remain stationed along the DMZ, which divides the peninsula between North Korea and South Korea (the number is expected to diminish to 24,500 next year). The U.S. forces are there to keep an uneasy peace between the two Koreas and prevent war from erupting again. The analogy to Korea is meant to portray the Iraq conflict as a long-term one that requires a residual “over-the-horizon” military presence, mainly to support indigenous forces and keep the peace. “The idea is more a model of a mutually-agreed arrangement, whereby we have a long and enduring presence, but one that is by consent of both parties and under certain conditions,” Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates told reporters in early June. He also said the Korean model stood in contrast to the aftermath of the Vietnam War, where “we just left lock, stock and barrel.”

Still, some opponents of the war, including several presidential aspirants, have seized on this comparison as a justification for keeping U.S. forces in Iraq indefinitely. This CFR.org issue tracker examines the positions of current 2008 candidates. Democratic presidential candidate Bill Richardson, for instance, has called for “zero troops,” including residual forces, as well as for a withdrawal of embassy staff if the security situation worsens.

Others say Korea is a faulty model, and a residual force will only embolden Islamic radicals and arouse suspicions that U.S. interests are related more to oil than democracy promotion. “Any U.S. bases remaining in Iraq, either to keep a finger on the oil, or to act as a jumping off point for attacking Iran, will similarly quickly come under withering attack from Iraqi insurgents and al-Qaeda,” writes Ivan Eland of the Independent Institute, a public-policy research organization.

The Lebanon Model

Lebanon’s 1975-1990 civil war illustrates that long and violent factional fighting can draw regional countries into a wider war. But some experts say Iraq is different and argue the sectarian violence would stay relatively contained and not spread to neighboring countries. “Such meddlers tend to seek advantage in their neighbors’ civil wars, not to spread them, which is why they rely on proxies to do their fighting,” write CFR's Steven Simon and Ray Takeyh in the Washington Post. “You can already see that pattern at work in Iraq today.”

The Lebanon model was promoted by some White House officials back in 2004 as a blueprint for dealing with Iraq. Before last summer’s war, Lebanon was seen as an example of how a failed state could transition into a relatively stable democracy in the Arab world, held together by a power-sharing arrangement, however tenuous. “It works in a flawed-but-muddling-through sort of way,” Michael J. Totten, a Beirut-based journalist, wrote in the Wall Street Journal in January 2006. “ what makes this place unique is that the Lebanese political system is nearly incapable of producing dictatorship.” Although eighteen months later, Lebanon teeters on the brink of sectarian war, some experts say its power-sharing agreement between sectarian camps with competing agendas and claims to land may provide a model, however flawed, for Iraq to follow.

But other analysts fear Iraq may result in something worse than Lebanon at its nadir in the 1980s. “Lebanon’s simmering civil war eventually burned itself out and left a coherent, albeit weak, state in its ashes,” writes Christopher J. Fettweis of the U.S. Naval War College in the Los Angeles Times. “Iraq could soon more closely resemble Somalia in the 1990s, an utterly collapsed, uncontrolled, lawless, failed state that destabilizes the most vital region in the world.” Democratic presidential candidates, similarly, regularly refer to the prospect of “genocide” in postwar Iraq.

The Vietnam Model

The Vietnam War ended in a four-year-long withdrawal of U.S. forces followed by the fall of Saigon and the rest of South Vietnam to the North Vietnamese. In Vietnam, the U.S. military slowly handed over combat duties to local forces as part of its “Vietnamization” campaign. Some analysts say employing a similar strategy in Iraq would be complicated because the conflict is more of a communal civil war, not an ideological struggle for national liberation. “Such a policy,” writes CFR’s Stephen Biddle in Foreign Affairs, “might have made sense in Vietnam, but in Iraq it threatens to exacerbate the communal tensions that underlie the conflict and undermine the power-sharing negotiations needed to end it.” Some say the lesson of the “Vietnam model,” as it applies to Iraq, is to maintain a U.S. presence and economic aid to sustain a political solution. “The shame of Vietnam is not that we were there in the first place, but that we betrayed our ally in the end,” wrote former Defense Secretary Melvin R. Laird in Foreign Affairs. Adds Henry Kissinger, a former secretary of state, in a recent op-ed: “The essential prerequisite for such a political solution is staying power in the near term.”

Fettweis says Vietnam is an apt comparison to Iraq because both represented major strategic mistakes in U.S. foreign policy, turning public opinion against the White House and against interventionism in general—what became know as “Vietnam Syndrome.” But he says the significance of pulling en masse out of Iraq, like Vietnam before it, may prove to be overplayed by the war’s architects. “ust as the war’s critics predicted in the 1960s, Vietnam turned out to be strategically irrelevant,” he writes. “Saigon fell, but no dominoes followed; the balance of Cold War power did not change.”

The Bosnia Model

The “nation building” parallels between Iraq and Bosnia are manifold. The Iraq Study Group, among other sources, has advocated a Dayton-like peace process to bring in Iraq’s neighbors to cooperate on border control and security operations. Moreover, Iraq’s Kurds, Sunnis, and Shiites have made fitful attempts to reach a power-sharing agreement, much as the various ethnic factions did in Bosnia-Herzegovina during the mid-1990s. Troop deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan have been compared to foreign troop proportions deployed to keep peace in the former Yugoslavia (to meet the troop-to-civilian ratios applied in Bosnia, the coalition would have to deploy 258,000 thousand forces to Iraq). And Bosnia may give development specialists a blueprint on rebuilding Iraq’s economy, particularly regarding how much foreign aid to give per capita.

But the main use of the “Bosnia model” has come from advocates who favor a looser federation rather than a centralized state, not unlike Bosnia post-1995. “The idea, as in Bosnia, is to maintain a united Iraq by decentralizing it, giving each ethno-religious group—Kurd, Sunni Arab, and Shiite Arab—room to run its own affairs, while leaving the central government in charge of common interests,” wrote Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr. (D-DE) and the Council on Foreign Relations’ President Emeritus Leslie H. Gelb in the New York Times. “In effect, Iraq is already becoming Bosnia,” adds Michael E. Hanlon of the Brookings Institution, writing in the Washington Times. Decentralization in Iraq, like Bosnia, would require land swaps, the separation of ethnic groups, and a political agreement that disperses powers to the regions, while keeping a unitary state. “Ethnic relocation is distasteful and not free from risk but if carried out with care as government policy, it can occur with less trauma than in the Balkans,” adds O’Hanlon.

Yet others disagree. More than a decade after the Dayton Peace accords, some say that Bosnia’s Serbs, Croats, and Muslims still do not share a unified vision for the country as a whole. “Of all the ironies of the American adventure in Iraq, perhaps none is larger than using the ‘success’ of Bosnia as a model to solve the sectarian violence now raging in Baghdad,” write Don Hays of the U.S. Institute of Peace, R. Bruce Hitchner of the Dayton Project, and Edward P. Joseph in the International Herald Tribune. “The Dayton legacy of balancing power at the central, cantonal, and local levels is hopelessly dysfunctional.” They say Bosnian Serbs, emboldened by Kosovo’s push for independence, may be poised to pull out of the Dayton arrangement. Moreover, Bosnia, given its porous borders, remains a lawless haven for drug and arms traffickers, terrorists, and other organized crime elements.

From CFR.org. Reprinted with permission. For more analysis on foreign policy and international relations, go to www.cfr.org.
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3 juillet 2007 2 03 /07 /juillet /2007 09:42
U.S. says 23 militants killed in Iraq battle

50 minutes ago

 

Photo



BAGHDAD (Reuters) - U.S. forces killed at least 23 insurgents suspected of having links with al Qaeda during a fierce battle in Iraq's western Anbar province over the weekend, the military said on Tuesday.


The military said U.S. and Iraqi forces, backed by war planes and helicopters, confronted a large group of militants as they were preparing to launch a series of suicide bomb attacks in the Anbar capital Ramadi, 110 km (68 miles) west of Baghdad.

"Coalition and Iraqi security forces received reports that a significant number of anti-Iraqi forces had gathered on the outskirts of Ramadi to stage a series of large-scale attacks," the military said in a statement.

"The group, affiliated with al Qaeda in Iraq, intended to regain a base of operations in Al Anbar with suicide car and vest bomb attacks."

Anbar was once the heart of the Sunni Arab insurgency and the most dangerous region for American soldiers in Iraq.

But local Sunni Arab tribes began to turn against Sunni Islamist al Qaeda last year, angered by the militant group's indiscriminate killing of civilians and harsh interpretation of Islam in the areas it held sway.

Many al Qaeda militants have since been driven out of Anbar and into provinces north of Baghdad.

The U.S. military described the weekend fighting as a "battle," saying it began on Saturday and continued into Sunday. It said a search of the area following the clashes found 22 dead insurgents, including seven who were wearing suicide vests. Another militant was killed later on Sunday.

"Most of the enemy were dressed in similar white dishdasha (robes) and white running shoes, an outfit often associated with extremist fighters prepared to kill themselves," the statement said.

"Helicopter gun ships and fighter jets provided aerial surveillance and engaged multiple enemy positions, including the destruction of an enemy bunker complex with precision guided munitions."

The U.S. military has described its cooperation with the Sunni Arab tribes in Anbar as one of the biggest success stories in Iraq in recent months.

Du point de vue, maintenant des critiques qui émargeraient d'un tableau rose de la nouvelle situation ainsi générée :

- 1) des rivalités entre différents alliés des Américains parmi les tribus les plus dominantes au Anbar. Les unes accusent les autres de double-jeu, ou d'arbitraire dans une "chasse à Al Qaeda" qui déborderait sur des mesures restrictives pour les populations.

-2) Des informations relatives à la recherche d'asile à l'étrangers pour des dignitaires de niveau moyen ou bas du nouveau régime irakien.

 

Iraqi Papers Tues: Tribal Troubles
 
Pro-Government Tribes Clashing over Power and Influence
 
By AMER MOHSEN Posted 6 hr. 35 min. ago
Az-Zaman
Az-Zaman
Operation Arrowhead Ripper, currently underway in Diyala, is joining the US Army and the Iraqi government forces in a battle against al-Qa'ida and anti-US groups in the province, especially around the city of Ba'quba.

According to al-Hayat however, the US is also fighting side by side with Iraqi tribal militias who have chosen to side with the Americans in their fight against al-Qa'ida; furthermore, Iraqi insurgent groups that are engaged in a battle against US forces may be joining hands with the Americans to combat the extremist group and the “Islamic State in Iraq.”

The pan-Arab, London-based newspaper described a new form of cooperation between the US forces and local tribes and their militias. Al-Hayat said that the US tends to employ a “special Iraqi military unit, that it armed and trained” to support its operations in Shi'a area; and solicits help from the official Iraqi armed forces for operations in the Sunni regions, “but (the US) has lately been recruiting clans and armed (groups)” in its recent actions.

The use of tribes by US forces, al-Hayat claimed, “is causing an acute conflict among tribes and armed groups.”

In what concerns insurgent groups, the paper claimed that the “Brigades of the 1920 revolution,” which are responsible for hundreds of attacks against the US and British forces, but are also engaged in a bitter rivalry with al-Qa'ida, have suffered a split when a wing from the movement elected to fight alongside the Americans against extremist Wahhabis. The armed group insists that it does not take part in the US-led anti-Qa'ida operations in Ba'quba and elsewhere, but “close sources” to the organization told al-Hayat that “one of the wings (of the 1920 Brigades) and tribal fighters have joined the American campaign.”

The situation among tribes is far more complex, the paper said. US aid has made certain tribes (namely those associated with the US and the government) extremely powerful, and has given them quasi-control over large areas in Anbar and elsewhere. As a result, tribal competition and enmities are flaring.

A rivalry has emerged between Sheikh 'abd al-Sattar Abu Risha, head of the pro-government “Anbar Salvation Council” and Sheikh 'ali Hatim al-Dulaimi, who is active in “the Anbar Awakening Council,” also an anti-Qa'ida organization.

Al-Hayat reported that al-Dulaimi accused Sheikh Abu Risha and his “Anbar Salvation Council” of “abusing his authority” and “employing excessive force against civilians, and using the police to perform thefts.” The paper said that ‘Abu Risha defended his measures, affirming that they are directed exclusively at al-Qa'ida.”

The paper quoted al-Dulaimi as saying that “(Abu Risha) fights al-Qa'ida during the day and leads gangs of thieves during the night.” Al-Hayat opined that the situation could lead to “tribal confrontations” in Anbar if these conflicts were not resolved.

In other news, Az-Zaman published a front-page report on a new phenomenon in Iraq: official Iraqi delegations that demand asylum once they’re abroad on state duties. The paper said that many mid-level and upper-level state officials are working constantly to obtain emigration visas for them and their families, and that “high-level employees have exploited their presence abroad on official commissions ... to remain abroad.”

Az-Zaman quoted a “foreign diplomat” in Iraq who allegedly informed a state official that his country will stop issuing visas to Iraqi delegations, “even if they were on a ministerial level,” after realizing that most delegations that were allowed to enter his country “have filed for political or humanitarian asylum, placing his government in a difficult position.”

The newspaper interviewed several high-level state employees who were either working to receive emigration visas or have already placed their families abroad; one of the interviewees was asked about his impetus to leave Iraq, since he has “a high-level position and a hefty salary.” The employee responded by saying: “my proximity to the center of decision is pushing me to leave the country; I believe that the problems of politicians and leaders will not end soon, and are pushing the country into a fearsome abyss.”

 

 

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2 juillet 2007 1 02 /07 /juillet /2007 23:00
Iraqi Special Operations Forces capture Amir of al-Qaeda in Karada

Monday, 02 July 2007

Multi-National Corps – Iraq
Public Affairs Office, Camp Victory
APO AE 09342

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
RELEASE No. 20070702-24
July 2, 2007

Iraqi Special Operations Forces capture Amir of al-Qaeda in Karada
Multi-National Corps – Iraq PAO

BAGHDAD – Iraqi Special Operations Forces detained the alleged Al Qaeda Amir of Karada in central Baghdad during an operation June 28. The targeted individual is accused of coordinating attacks against Iraqi and Coalition Forces using improvised explosive devices, indirect fire and small arms.  The individual is also the alleged leader of an Al Qaeda cell that operates in the same area.

ISOF also seized an AK-47 rifle, ammunition, cell phones, handcuffs, ID cards and documents from the residence where the targeted individual was located.

The capture of this individual will disrupt the Al Qaeda cell activities against the local population in the Baghdad area and disrupt Al Qaeda attacks on Iraqi and Coalition Forces.

Coalition Forces were present as advisors.  No Iraqi or Coalition Forces were injured during the operation.

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2 juillet 2007 1 02 /07 /juillet /2007 17:14
Iran Factor
US Implicates Iran in January Attack
 
US Spokesman: Detainees Implicate Qods Force in Death of Five American Soldiers
 
Posted 0 hr. 43 min. ago
Baghdad, IRAQ: A US solider shows a picture of Ali Mussa Daqduq (L) 02 July 2007 during a press conference at the heavily fortified Green Zone area in Baghdad.
AFP/Getty
Baghdad, IRAQ: A US solider shows a picture of Ali Mussa Daqduq (L) 02 July 2007 during a press conference at the heavily fortified Green Zone area in Baghdad.
Iran's covert Qods Force helped plan a brazen militant assault on US forces that killed five American troops in Karbala in January, according to a US military spokesman.

Brig. Gen. Kevin Bergner told reporters in Baghdad Monday that detainees facing accusations of ordering the Karbala assault have confessed that senior operatives from Iran supported the attack.

According to Bergner, the militants said "senior leadership leading the Quds Force knew of and supported planning for the eventual Karbala attack that killed five coalition soldiers."

Bergner reported the connection was made by a senior Lebanese Hezbollah operative, Ali Mussa Dakdouk, who was captured in southern Iraq on March 20. Bergner claimed Dakdouk served 24 years in Hezbollah and had gone to Iraq "as a surrogate for the Iranian Quds force."

According to Bergner, Dadouk served as a liaison between Iran and Qais al-Kazaali, a former spokesman for cleric Muqtada al-Sadr who now leads his own Shi'ite group. Bergner said al-Kazaali's group carried out the brazen Karbala attack when gunmen, disguised as Americans, tricked their way into a government compound, killing one U.S. soldier immediately and abducting and later killing four others.

Bergner said the attackers spoke English, wore American-looking uniforms and carried U.S.-style weapons, which helped get them through Iraqi checkpoints. Bergner blamed the sophistication of the attack on the Qods Force.

"The Qods Force had developed detailed information regarding our soldiers' activities, shift changes and defences, and this information was shared with the attackers," Bergner said.

Bergner also reported the US had discovered three small camps near Tehran where Qods Force and Hezbollah operatives were training between 20-60 Iraqi Shi'ite militants at any given time.

US commanders have previously accused Iran of financing and arming the Iraqi militants, but this was the first time they have alleged that Iranian officers had prior knowledge of the attack.

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  • : Le blog de Gad
  • : Lessakele : déjouer les pièges de l'actualité Lessakele, verbe hébraïque qui signifie "déjouer" est un blog de commentaire libre d'une actualité disparate, visant à taquiner l'indépendance et l'esprit critique du lecteur et à lui prêter quelques clés de décrytage personnalisées.
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Magie de la langue hébraïque


A tous nos chers lecteurs.

 

Ne vous est-il jamais venu à l'esprit d'en savoir un peu plus sur le titre de ce blog ?

Puisque nous nous sommes aujourd'hui habillés de bleu, il conviendrait de rentrer plus a fond dans l'explication du mot lessakel.

En fait Lessakel n'est que la façon française de dire le mot léhasskil.

L'hébreu est une langue qui fonctionne en déclinant des racines.

Racines, bilitères, trilitères et quadrilitères.

La majorité d'entre elle sont trilitères.

Aussi Si Gad a souhaité appeler son site Lessakel, c'est parce qu'il souhaitait rendre hommage à l'intelligence.

Celle qui nous est demandée chaque jour.

La racine de l'intelligence est sé'hel שכל qui signifie l'intelligence pure.

De cette racine découlent plusieurs mots

Sé'hel > intelligence, esprit, raison, bon sens, prudence, mais aussi croiser

Léhasskil > Etre intelligent, cultivé, déjouer les pièges

Sé'hli > intelligent, mental, spirituel

Léhistakel > agir prudemment, être retenu et raisonnable, chercher à comprendre

Si'hloute > appréhension et compréhension

Haskala >  Instruction, culture, éducation

Lessa'hlen > rationaliser, intellectualiser

Heschkel > moralité

Si'htanout > rationalisme

Si'hloul > Amélioration, perfectionnement

 

Gageons que ce site puisse nous apporter quelques lumières.

Aschkel pour Lessakel.

 

 

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